Man You don't stop riding when you get old poster

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Man You don\’t stop riding when you get old poster : A History of Horseback RidingFacebookTwitterPinterestGmailPrintShareIn the beginning, horses were wild untamed animals. But on the day when a first human jumped onto the back of a horse and observed the world from that height, the timeline of horseback riding history was changed forever. Humans and horses have a long, interrelated history, yet no one is truly certain when and where horses were first domesticated and ridden.The history of a horse goes back 50 million years, to a small animal named Hyracotherium which lived in North America. Horses crossed over multiple times the Bering Land Bridge which existed during the end of last Ice Age from the Americas to Asia, and eventually spread to Europe. All horses’ ancestors vanished from the Americas about 10,000 years ago. Fossils of Eohippus, as the first horses have been called, showed the mammal to be an herbivore smaller than a dog.Hyracotherium was a primative mammal, one of the first Horses, dating back to the early Eocene period. Measuring roughly one meter long, it was a herbivore which would have lived in small herds.Eohippus lived primarily in North America but vanished from the continent entirely around 9000 years ago for reasons that remain a mystery. Horses did not return to North America until the fifteenth century A.D. We do know that the first horses had toes, not hooves, and looked nothing like the horses of today. They were much smaller and ate leaves.Ancient horse called Eohippus lived in North America buteventually died off .Changing habitat from swamplands to dry savannahs caused the horse to evolve from a creature with multiple toes to one with a single toe, which later became a hoof and which is better adapted to roaming dry ground. Pliocene epoch created Pliohippus, the first single-toed horse. Man You don\’t stop riding when you get old poster : Pliohippus serves as a prototype for our own Equus, the modern horse. Pliohippus had a ligament-sprung hoof and longer legs with flexing ligaments, which gave way to a running action similar to that of the modern horse.Pliohippus life restoration by M. Marcuson.The history of horse riding timeline usually goes back to central Asia about five centuries or so before the appearance of cavalry in armies of Middle East around 1000 B.C. But new evidence based on dental wear caused by a bit in a prehistoric horse indicates that riding began much earlier.Prehistoric people began to tame horses in a Copper Age 6000 years ago. The domestication of the horse signaled a major innovation in transport and communication.Before 4000 B.C. horses were wild and lived through the vast plains of grasslands in Eastern Europe and Asia.Horses recovered from prehistoric sites in Europe might have been used as wild game, as domesticated sources of meat and as mounts. Around this time, the horses were too small to actually carry people. Eventually, they were bred to larger sizes but it took time. Man You don\’t stop riding when you get old poster : A lot of time.Bronze Horse, Greek Geometric Metal ArtAt some point humans began to see horses as more than simply sources of food. It is probable that humans used horses to pull a plow and later to pull the wheeled vehicles, such as chariots before humans learned to ride them.Although it is fare to say that farmers didn’t usually use horses for plowing in the ancient times because they usually used oxen instead, or simply turned over the soil by hand. Horses were too expensive.Sometimes humans used horses to pull a plow but it was economically ineffective compared to oxen.The period from 4000 to 3000 B.C. is considered the true age of the domestication of the horse. Domestication is believed to have first taken place on the steppes north of the Black Sea. Evidence of mounted warriors found in China supports the theory that horses were extensively ridden for the first time around 4000 B.C.No good harness arrangement for horses was invented until about 200 BC, when in China it was initially discovered.The horse was thought to be first harnessed in the Near East around 2000 B.C. Evidence of man’s early interactions with the horse comes mostly in the form of tapestries, relief pottery, and other works of art The horse was thought to be first harnessed in the Near East around 2000 B.C. Evidence of man’s early interactions with the horse comes mostly in the form of tapestries, relief pottery, and other works of art.Man You don\’t stop riding when you get old poster :

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